Tag Archives: review

Review: Topo Fli-Lyte

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Founded by the former CEO of Vibram, Tony Post, Topo Athletics is a portmanteau of his name. Keeping to his minimalist background, the company focuses on a range of athletic shoes catering to different sports from running to Cross-fit. They originally came out with a tabi, or split-toe design as shown below, but have now shifted to a more traditional shoe form. The Fli-Lytes are an example of these – a nice lightweight speedy trainer. They are spec’ed out to weigh 8.2 oz for size 9 and came in at 10.1 oz for my size 13.

topo-athletic

 Upper/Fit

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I received the Black/Mango color way on my pair. Honestly, I think that they are one of the coolest looking pairs of shoes I have. They look both fast and aggressive, kind of reminding me of a muscle car.

The fit is very comfortable with a spacious toebox, without being too swimmy and I had no trouble feeling locked in at midfoot. I also like how they are using 3d printing to form the uppers, it’s definitely futuristic. Tony Post talks about this in the Gearist Podcast #3 which can be seen below:

Midsole

The Topo Fli-Lytes have a good firm ride, without being too stiff. They feel very similar to the ride of the Skechers GOrun 4s that I reviewed here. They are neutral with stack heights of 22mm at the rear to 19mm at the front putting them solidly in the minimalist category with a very small 3mm drop. I personally prefer drops right around the 4mm mark and I find them to be very comfortable. I definitely have solid proprioception when wearing them and that is very important to me.

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Outsole

The traction on the Fli-Lytes is very solid. I feel like there is good grip without the shoes being sticky. I run roads and sidewalks primarily and they have a nice balanced feel.

I have over 40 miles in the shoes and don’t see any wear at all. They honestly don’t feel as if they have been broken in. I can see easily getting a good couple hundred miles in. With my weight of 200ish lbs, that is a good number for running shoes.

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Conclusion

As a whole, the Topo Fli-lytes are really solid trainers. They are comfortably wide without being swimmy, light without being fragile, and tough without being clunky. Pretty solid all around. I personally feel comfortable with them from 10K – half marathon, but can see many wearing them all the way to marathon. They are one cool looking but solid all-around trainer.

You can find them at Amazon at our affiliate link below (the site gets a small commission if you buy through it at no cost to you).

Review: Does the Garmin Vivosmart combine a FitBit Flex and Pebble?

It was with great excitement that I unboxed the Garmin Vivosmart. I had already reviewed the Vivofit and missed my Fitbit Flex for its size and unassuming design. Could this new offering from Garmin be the fitness band you rule them all?

It has such promise. It tracks your steps and sleep, tells time, and even can receive notifications from an iPhone or Android device.

But wait, there’s more. It can also act as a remote for a Garmin Virb, control music on your iPhone, and connect to a speed/cadence sensor to track a cycling workout. These are all some exciting features, but does it deliver? What kind of execution?

Within the box there are only a few items – The Vivosmart, a quick start manual, the charging cable, and the Vivokeeper which helps hold the clasp in place.

After opening the box, I saw that the Vivosmart powered on. Since I had Garmin Connect on my iPhone, I synced it. I already have a Vivofit and the app squawked that there could only be one fitness tracker, did I want to use this one (the Vivosmart)? I chose yes and it didn’t seem to work, so I deleted the Vivofit and Vivosmart from the app and tried again. This time it worked.

I was off and running. First, I put it on with the Garmin Vivofit that I already owned to get a comparison of size and step count over time.

As can be seen by the picture, the Vivosmart is definitely much narrower and less bulky all around. It also does not always have a display shown like the Vivofit. This makes it more similar to the Fitbit Flex. When it is not illuminated, the band is much more subtle and unobtrusive. The Vivosmart display is also backlit whereas the Vivofit is not.

However, the Vivofit has a much sharper display. This display is much more readable, while the Vivosmart is almost hazy as DCRainmaker noted in his post – First look at Garmin’s new Vivosmart activity tracker. It really is a problem as I will explain later. As far as step counts go, they are pretty close. After a few hours and 5000 steps, they were within a couple hundred. With fitness trackers, the numbers can be all over the place, so it’s a wash.

The Vivosmart also shares the movement bar and target steps with the Vivofit. The big difference being that while the Vivofit bar turns red and extends across the screen to prompt you to get up and move around, the Vivosmart is much more aggressive and vibrates.

Sadly, the way it chooses to vibrate seems to be arbitrary, or on a timer. I lost count of how many times I was up from my desk walking around when I felt a vibration on my wrist. I would look down to see if a notification came in, but it was just the band telling me to “Move”. Uh, hello? That’s what I’m doing Vivo-not-so-smart…

Music Controls

One feature that I wanted to try out were the playback controls. Or at least I thought they were playback controls and that Garmin just called them Music Controls. But no, they are music controls on the iPhone. I was listening to a podcast and hit the Play/Pause button and a song started in the Music player. It turns out that unlike most devices that control playback on the iPhone, the Vivosmart only works with the built-in music app. So, no audiobooks, podcasts, or Spotify for you.

Notifications

The main feature that got me excited about the Vivosmart was the ability to get notifications. The Vivosmart will start receiving alerts for any notification that displays on the lock screen of an iPhone (I tested this with an iPhone 6). Nothing is required. It starts receiving as soon as it is configured in Garmin Connect on the phone.

Here is an important productivity notification from the Words with Friends app:

And this is a notification from Twitter:

You scroll left and right to get through the notifications and touch the down arrow to scroll down and read the notification. As you can see, there is not much shown at a time. The Twitter notification simply shows who is sending it and my Twitter name. It disappears fairly quickly and  you have to scroll to retrieve it on the band.

Also, it actually took me several tries and angles to get the shots to be as clear as they are here. This is the ideal shot. I had a lot of trouble reading the notices on my wrist when they came in. Especially at an angle on my wrist. I found that I had to keep retrieving them again. It really is about as much trouble to pull the iPhone out of my pocket or a holster.

Compare what is shown above to what I use as my daily device for notifications – the Pebble Watch. Here is a tweet on the Pebble:

It is much clearer and you can immediately scroll up and down to read the rest of it. Also, you can click the center button to dismiss it. This removes it from both the Pebble and the lock screen on the iPhone. This is a relatively new feature on the Pebble, but still very handy.

Also, it may seem unfair to compare the Vivosmart to a full blown watch, but consider that the Pebble has been out for well over a year and is priced at $99, $70 less than the Vivosmart and has apps like Misfit to track steps and sleep as well.

Battery Life

Another consideration is battery life. And this is a big one. I had a Fitbit Flex and it got 6-7 days battery life on average. The Pebble gets 5-7 days with constant notices. The Vivosmart? Well, day one I took it out of the box and used it. That evening I got a battery low notice and it was dead within two hours. When it is dead, it’s as active as a rubber bracelet. No low battery icon or anything.

Now, in fairness, when looking at the quick start manual, the first thing shown is the following image. It seems to imply that the first thing to do is charge the device. But for how long? And why doesn’t it explicitly say it.

So, the next morning, I charged the device for some hours. It then held up for 2.5 days. Meh. Next charge was 3 days as well as the one after that, so I felt okay with it.

Then the next charge was a day and a half. And then it didn’t last from 10 AM until the next morning . I woke up and found a dead Vivosmart. When comparing it to the Vivofit which is supposed to last one year (I have had it for 3 months so far), this is aggravating.

Virb Control

The remote control for the Virb works fine. You navigate to the Virb menu and it will connect to the device. You then can tap to either record video or take a picture. The only issue is that the band goes asleep, so you have to tap to wake it, then you can tap to stop or start the recording. This added step should be considered when you are using it in the field. You will need to enable the remote setting on the Virb camera in addition to enabling the Virb screen on the Vivosmart.

Cycling

The cycling functionality is interesting. It works right away. You have to enable the feature in Garmin Connect for it to show. As soon as you have the feature enabled, you will be prompted to pedal for the device to connect to the Speed or Speed and Cadence sensor. After it has detected it, press the fitness icon (it resembles a runner) and then a play/pause button appears. This button starts a workout timer. Press that and start riding. The you can press the button again to stop the workout. Press the save button (floppy disk I wonder when that symbol will go away) to save the activity or the trash can to delete.

When you save the workout, it will automatically be loaded into Garmin Connect. You can see them below:

One really cool feature was that at the time I was wearing a heart rate monitor with a Garmin Fenix 2 watch. This heart rate monitor was detected by the Vivosmart and connected automatically without any intervention from me.

Unfortunately though, the speed was  vastly optimistic. I had me averaging 24.04 miles and hour with a top speed of 2808.14 miles per hour. I promise that I wasn’t riding a rocket at the time. The ride as tracked on the Fenix 2 with GPS is below:

Update Issues

Another issue I fought with was an inability to update the device. I kept being teased by the “New Updates Available” message in the Garmin Connect app. I would hook the VivoSmart up to external power, remove it, and then see Update Failed.

This happened numerous times. Ironically, the update it was trying to apply included “Changes to make future updates coming from iOS 8 download reliably.” in the Change History. I finally was able to get the Vivosmart to update by connecting it to my laptop and pressing and holding the battery icon. A USB icon appears that it is connected. You can then use Garmin Express which can be downloaded from www.garminconnect.com/vivosmart. On the page, in the statement “Don’t have a compatible phone? You can set up and sync your vívosmart on your computer,” click the link “on your computer.”

Conclusion

There is a lot to like about the Garmin Vivosmart, but it is not without issues. It has many features, but they are not all quite ready yet. Hopefully some of it can be improved by firmware updates. But at this point, it feels like the product is not fully baked. The device is being sold exclusively at Best Buy until November 2014 but you can pre-order it from Clever Training (This is an affiliate link and I will receive a small commission). Maybe by the time it is rolled out to a wider release, it will be more solid.

A Thousand Days with MyFitnessPal

I have just reached a major milestone on my journey back to health. I have reached 1000 days of logging into MyFitnessPal and tracking my calories.

This all started January 3rd, 2012. It was a New Year’s resolution that I had been planning for a year or two- procrastination is my middle name.

Now that I decided that I was going to start losing weight. My plan was to lower my overall calorie input and especially my carbs. I had read good things about low carb dieting.

My first task was to weigh in — 283 lbs — gulp. Next, I needed a tool to track both my progress and my input. Since I am a major data geek, it had to be online and preferably have an app.

After looking at several apps, I kept tripping over the name MyFitnessPal. I kept looking because it was suspect to me. I’ll explain why momentarily.

After really looking at everything out there, I finally decided to give it a try.

Here is my pitch for it:

Do you need to have a food log/diary to keep track of what you have consumed in a day? How much would you pay?

Do you want to have a community of really helpful and supportive people to both keep you accountable and cheer you on?  Now how much would you pay?

Do you want a tool that has support for nearly all prominent third party exercise apps and tools?

do you want to use an app that is updated frequently and supporting new features almost as soon as they are available, like Apple HealthKit?

do you want an app that provides functionality for you to document your own progress through a blog?

This is how much you are going to pay… Nothing.

Thats right , it’s free. And I’m embarrassed to say, that’s why I hesitated to use it. I have always believed that you get what you pay for. MyFitnessPal is a true exception.

I have spoken of my journey through weight loss to racing a marathon on multiple podcasts here and hereMyFitnessPal almost always comes up. It offers so much value, that I feel guilty not paying for it. I would actually donate with a PayPal link if I had the option.

I have used many tools from FitBits to Garmins, but one tool has remained consistent for me – MyFitnessPal.

FlipBelt Review – It’ll fit the iPhone 6 Plus

 

Like I found with LaceLocker, sometimes the simplest ideas make the best products. In a day when we are trying to figure out how to carry many varied items, it can be a struggle. We often have to leave something behind.

For example, when I ran my first marathon, I had to make some decisions. Do I want to have my car key and all the gels and skip my iPhone, or do I want to leave a couple gels out. I wound up putting a couple in my short pockets and hoping for the best.

That’s where FlipBelt comes in. It is a really simple concept. It is a band made of EPA Certified, Odor Resistant, Pilling Resistant, Anti-Bacterial High Tech Poly Spandex Fabric as described on the product information page.

All along the belt, are slits that act as pockets. This offers an ingenious method of storing items like your phone, keys, gels and more. There are even hooks to help prevent your keys from slipping out.

One thing really nice about the setup is that the FlipBelt will hold a smartphone quite securely. It also allows you to shift it to nearly any location along your waist. This is especially important if you are using bluetooth headphones like the Thump BLU. You may have to place the phone in a good location to prevent clipping.

Perhaps the most important feature is that the FlipBelt will fit many different sized phones. I tested it out using my iPhone 5s, but with the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus just introduced, I was very concerned about how I could carry them. So I tested with a co-worker’s giant phone – the Samsung Note 2.

Even though FlipBelt does not claim to fit the Note 2 in their FAQ (with some qualifications). I was in fact able to fit the phone — although the FlipBelt looked like a snake consuming prey.

With the iPhone 6 Plus being even thinner than the Samsung Note 2, it should fit in the FlipBelt. It may be a little bit of a squeeze, but the FlipBelt is a definite accessory you can use to carry it while running.

The only issues I can find with the FlipBelt is that it is a quick wicking material and will absorb your sweat. After a hot run, mine becomes a DripBelt. So make sure that you put your electronics (i.e. phone) in plastic bags if that is an issue. They also claim that they will provide a free plastic bag with your purchase in their FAQ, but when I went to the checkout, I only saw the option to buy a three pack. I will email support about that.

Overall, the FlipBelt is a very good product that serves a need for flexible, light storage. It is very comfortable to wear and delivers on its promise.

FlipBelts can be ordered at flipbelt.com or from Amazon below. I will get a small commission for the sales.

 

 

Thump Bluetooth Headphones – Review

I visited the Thump Booth at the expo for the Virginia Beach Rock & Roll Half Marathon. There, I had the opportunity to meet the CEO of Thump, Todd Beetcher. His company originally named QAK was a start-up founded in 2011 as mentioned in the 2012 Denver Post article Headphones making noise, and Colorado companies join the party. It is a real treat to be able to speak to the owner of a company about his product. And Todd the “Thump-meister” is excited about his products.

Thump has four models of headphones starting with the entry level wired Thump Rap. Their mid-tier headphone is the Thump Blu — this was the one that founded the company. There is an advanced version of bluetooth headphones with the Thump XTreme. And they also have the Thump Fin which is a self contained mp3 player and headphone set for swimmers.

I am a major music, podcast, and audiobook addict so I bought a pair of Thump Blu to try out. I already have used several types of Bluetooth headphones with the Motorola SD-11 HD Flex being my current gold standard, so I will use them for comparisons.

The headphones come in a very nice reinforced Thump Case, which can be purchased separately. It is very solid, but light and pleasing to handle. It definitely will protect the headphones along with a couple other items.

As can be seen below, there is not a lot of excess packaging. Just the headphones, a quick start card, and the power supply. But not much more is needed. Just press the Phone button and hold until the blue and red LEDs are alternating and then open the Bluetooth settings on your phone. I tested with an iPhone 5s and it worked fine. It should work well with any modern smartphone that supports Bluetooth A2DP. Essentially most smart phones within the past 5 years should support.

The headphones themselves are very light which is good and don’t really draw a lot of attention to themselves. They also are designed to wear either above or below the ear, which is really unique. This enables them to be worn when laying back, dealing with a headrest and they can fit under a bike helmet. I successfully wore them under a bike helmet over the ear and didn’t have a need to try them the other way. I do prefer the sound when they are over my ears.

The sound of the headphones is very good. It is nicely balanced with a full spacious tone. They are not as bass driven as some headphones, but that is not a bad thing. They still sound rich and have good clarity.

One nice feature of the headphones that really like over the Motorola S10s, S11s, or even some Plantronics Backbeat 903+ that I have is the control functions. With all of my bluetooth headphones, I find it difficult to work the volume while wearing them.

I find it so difficult that I actually am in the habit of turning up the volume all the way and then using the volume on the side of the phone to control levels. This is not the case with the Thump BLU. It has discreet volume buttons that are easy to find and manipulate. This is a huge feature for convenience. Another usability feature involves moving forward and backward through tracks.

On the Motorola units, I have to double-tap a button to advance and triple-tap to reverse. I usually can advance fine, but reversing often involves multiple attempts. When running, this is difficult. The Plantronics were so hard for me to manipulate, I forgot how to even do it with them.

The last feature of the phone is a really good battery life. It advertises 7 hours off of a 1 hour charge and I feel it delivers on this. I do find it odd that it uses a USB Mini cable instead of the more commonly used USB micro. Also, while it delivers and excellent battery life, how do you know when the battery is dead? […] Yep. Silence. It’s little disconcerting. You hit play a couple times when the music stops before you realize that the battery is just dead. There is no warning.

The headphones are sweat resistant, but not waterproof. Keep this in mind. If you are planning to run in a heavy downpour, This is the statement on the Website:

Built for active people, Thump Blu is designed to be sweat resistant. We have a lot of runners who ask about rain. The simple answer is put it away. Thump Blu is not designed to be a water resistant device.

Also note, if you are a heavy sweater like I have been in the high heat and humidity lately, you might have troubles. I was running and sweating like mad on tempo run and one of the earpieces stop emitting sound. I thought I might have burned it up. But when I blew on it, some weak sound came out. Later, when I was in the light, I was able to see that within the earpiece is very fine screen. This screen can capture the sweat, which in turn acts like a film and obstructs the sound.

Also, note that the Thump Blu should not be worn in the front of the body in the belt buckle region. Due to the electronic placement, you will likely experience clipping (where sound cuts out for short periods). This is because your body is a giant bag of water and that can obstruct the signal. This is very common with bluetooth headphones and something I have suffered with all of them but the Motorola S10 and S11 series.

Overall, the Thump BLU is a solid product and a good entry level headset in the world of bluetooth headphones. It has a reasonable price in an area where $100+ is the typical starting point and sounds very good.

They can be ordered at http://thumpu.com or at Amazon using my affiliate link below:

Bio Skin Calf Sleeves – Serious Compression [Updated]

Some weeks ago, I was asked to be an ambassador for the company Bio Skin. I told them that I needed to review a product and they offered to send a product and told me that their calf sleeves were especially popular.

I have never really been a big believer in Calf sleeves. I thought that they might look silly on me. But after suffering foot issues on and off for a while, it was between flare ups. This let me observe that my calves were extremely tight. Actually, some of my recent foot problems can be tied to the tightness in my calves pulling on my heels.

So, I decided that the calf sleeves would be a good choice. First thing, I had to measure to get the right size. I used a high-tech method involving earbuds and a ruler. I wrapped the earbuds around the thickest part of my calf and then laid it on a ruler, noted the spot, slid it up and added the totals. After doing this a couple times, I determined my calves were 16.5-17 inches. This put me right in XL or 16-18 inches.

The calf sleeves arrived in very straightforward no-frills packaging. The package is a recycling code of 1 or PET which I can recycle with the city, so big thumbs up there.

 

I pulled out the sleeves and they were.. Well, calf sleeves. The pair I got was black and no frills. Just the way I like it.

The material is hard to describe. It is definitely not your standard nylon/spandex blend.

I decided to put them on and feel how they worked before I tried to run with them in the early morning. I am not exactly a mental giant in the early AM.

I took them out the package, pulled on the top and the bottom to stretch them a little, and pulled them up my leg. They recommend that you don’t use any kind of lotion or have wet legs. This is a good idea because I had to get them off. That is where the hilarity ensued.

I walked around with them on for a few to see how they felt. It was very interesting. I haven’t worn compression before, so it was a new sensation for me. Then it was time for removal… I didn’t plan very well for this. I pulled them down and got one just over my heel.

It locked and I yanked. And twisted. And rolled. And had my wife laughing and taking pictures with the phone.

Finally I got one off and had to repeat the process with the second.

Well, it turns out that Bio Skin has a video up on YouTube describing how to work with the Calf Sleeves. DOH! Folks, I offer this service. I do stupid things so you don’t have to.

After I mastered the art of actually removing the calf skins, I put them up for a later run. That came a couple days later. I put them on, did my typical stretches (very light and half dynamic), and went for an easy run. I didn’t want to try too many miles on my first go.

I made it not quite a half mile when I felt an extreme cramping in my legs. It was like a herd of charley horses traversing my calves. I immediately yanked them down, massaged my calves and stretched until the pain subsided. I then ran 7.5 more miles and finished my run with some odd looking ankle bands.

In fairness, I was told that these calf skins were very compressive and needed to be broken in. As you can see from my earlier tale, I don’t always follow advice.

Since they are also made for post run recovery, I decided that I would use them after the Rock ‘n Roll Virginia Beach Half Marathon. Three days before the half marathon, I had a flare-up of a shin splint on my right leg that made me cut my run short.

I pulled out the Bio Skins and begin to wear them for a couple hours each day and by Saturday, I ran 10K without much pain in my right leg at all.

The half marathon turned out to be a disaster (I will be writing a race report) between my right leg, record heat and humidity — it turns out that it was the hottest in the history of the event — and dead legs from some tough training the week before. But, I did use the Bio Skins all afternoon and much of my leg pain was abated.

I do recommend this product with the caveat that it is some serious compression. I think of it as almost medical grade versus consumer. Take your time with them and really break them in. They are a definitely quality product.

UPDATE

I have been suffering with a serious shin splint on my right leg. After resting for an extra day and some serious icing, I was able to complete 7 miles wearing the Bio Skin Calf Sleeves. After wearing them several times in the days leading up, I had no trouble with them on the run and can credit them for helping me to get through it. I had no swelling afterward as well. Very cool. Very satisfied. Just make sure that you break them in a little.

Where to buy

You can purchase the calf sleeves using this link  Bio Skin Calf Sleeves. It is an affiliate link and I do earn a commission from it. However, I would not link to it if I didn’t feel it was a quality product.

If you are looking for other recovery products, you can also go to their main site at bioskin.com.

Sof Sole Running Select Sock Review

I managed to score a couple pairs of these socks at the Expo for the Virginia Beach Rock & Roll Half Marathon. I was nervous about fit because I am a size 12 shoe wearer, but use a size 13 running shoe. They were kind enough to let me open a pair and try them on the spot. They fit great, so I bought two packages of 2 pairs each.

I was a little worried and restrained myself from buying more. Because sometimes socks fit well   fit well at the store and then give me problems on the run.

I wore them on a 10K training run and they felt great. I didn’t want to drive down to the convention to get some more, but I really liked the socks and the price, so I got my buddy to pick up three more packs. He got two of his own on the recommendation as well.

As a Swiftwick customer, I found these socks to be comparable or even superior at a bargain price. They are less than half the price of Swiftwick.

They have a very comfortable form-fit that is snug around the arch of the foot without being too tight. The top of the socks have a very breathable mesh and stay very cool. And I like the slightly extended top that helps protect the achilles tendon from rubbing, not to mention prevents the sock from getting pulled down into the shoe.

The socks worked out so well, that I raced in them the next day for the half marathon. The race was a disaster, but the socks worked out great.

They come in multiple colors and are available at https://sofsole.com/product/running_select.

LaceLocker – One less thing to worry about

Sometimes, the highest praise I can give something is that I don’t notice it. It seems contrary, but it’s often true. Brilliance comes with the obvious. If you can look at something and say, “well, that’s obvious and someone would have come up with it in anyway,” ask yourself why no one has. That is good design.

LaceLocker is a simple product that perform a basic task – you just attach it and forget about it. Here is their video that sums up the process of putting them on your shoes. The video is 18 seconds long and a fair gauge of how long they take to install.

StashSports sent me a pair to try out for review. After receiving them, I decided to use them on three different pairs of shoes made by three different companies to see how they performed with different footwear.

I started with my Brooks PureCadence 2s. As you can see, they hold the laces in place and when I ran, there was no flapping about. Overall they were a great success – super match.

However, when I used them on my Saucony Kinvara 3s, they don’t fit quite as well. They only held on to one row of laces. The tongue holder prevents the device from sliding under a second row, and it’s not quite long enough to catch the third row. I wear a size 13 running shoe, so that may not be an issue for smaller feet. Also, even though it was only being held with one row, it did hold the laces securely for a good 10 mile run with some definite headwinds. It just wasn’t as aesthetically pleasing.

For my third set of shoes, I chose my Altra Torins. On these shoes, the tongue holder was in the way again, but there was plenty of room to slide it under on the side. Again, the laces stayed in place and there was no trouble.

I really like the fact that I can move the LaceLockers from one pair of shoes to another with ease, so one can buy a single pair and get full utility out of them if on a budget. I think that they are priced very well and can represent a savings from having to buy special non-slipping laces for each pair of shoes. I also like the fact that you retain the ability to retie and adjust your laces quickly. When I have my shoes double-knotted, I have to almost make sure that they are welded perfectly in place because I won’t be changing the configuration any time soon.

The product is actually so simple that I could have summed up the whole review in a short tweet – “LaceLockers, they’re simple and they work.”

They can be purchased for $7.95 and up on their website – http://www.lacelocker.com/purchase.html.

One interesting option is that they allow custom orders – http://www.lacelocker.com/customorders/ That could be a really neat item given out at races.